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Archive for the Category 'Treasure Stories'

Lost treasure is where you find it

Monday, March 14th, 2011

Lost treasure is where you find it, and you never know where that might be!

On a recent job just inside the Alabama border we met our client’s neighbor who had come to naysay our recovery efforts. She and her husband own two small farms 50 miles away. She mentioned they were thinking of remodeling one which meant filling in an old well on the back porch.

“Don’t do that until I check it,” I told her. “Back in the day, folks often hid their valuables in wells. You might cover up a fortune and never know it.”

She was skeptical. It just happened I was heading for another job a few hundred miles north of her place so I arranged a detour. She met me at the gate and on the drive to her place she asked why anyone would hide anything in a well.

“In this area, there was one big reason,” I said. “It was called the Civil War. When soldiers, especially Yankee soldiers, were in the area people would hurry to hide anything of value. The family silver, gold coins, anything that water wouldn’t ruin could be tied in a table cloth, dropped down the well and fished out later. For one reason or another, not all of it was recovered creating a whole genre of lost treasure. You’d be surprised what we’ve found.”

“I’ll never be that lucky,” she said.

Unfortunately, she was right about the well. I told her to fill it and enjoy her new porch. “While I’m here, give me a tour of the other farm,” I suggested. “We have time before I have to get to the next job.”

The second farm didn’t appear as old as the first. The house was built about 70 years ago. Several hundred yards down the road in a field was an abandoned low roofed, clapboard, two-room shack. “What’s that,” I asked.

“This farm originally had hundreds of acres. It was share cropped. That’s one of the share cropper’s cabins,” she explained as we pulled into the drive.

“Let’s take a look at that. There could be a fortune in hidden lost treasure under the floor.”

Still not believing, she laughed and said, “The kids have been all over this place with a metal detector. If you need rusty horse shoes, window weights, or wire, you’re in business.”

“A metal detector only reaches down about 15 inches,” I explained. The equipment we use for Underground Discovery leaves standard metal detectors and the lost treasure they never find in the dirt. No pun intended.” It only took a few minutes to set up the Long Range Gold Detector. Bingo!!! We got a hit. “Just for the fun of it, let’s see if there’s any silver out there, too.” Double Bingo!!! Another hit.

We shooed a couple of mules out of the way as we walked through the pasture trying to pinpoint our target. It was ten feet in front of that share cropper’s shack. We found a quart mason jar filled with gold and silver coins buried three feet deep under an old post that had once been part of a hitching rail (commonly referred to as a “post bank”). Another lost treasure found!

The jar we found may have been small but it held some valuable coins. How valuable? Let’s just say my new friend is enjoying her back porch…at her new vacation home in Belize. Underground Discovery has another “believer” to verify our results.

Buried treasure or hidden lost treasure is truly where you find it. In most cases there are no surviving stories of treasure or treasure map to direct you to the cache. In this case the “unbeliever” might have sold the farm and the treasure without ever knowing of a lost treasure. Before you sell the family ranch or just want to know if you are sitting on buried treasure, e-mail us using the form below or call for a free consultation 480 463 7464.

NOTE:
Underground Discovery’s equipment was able to search the 60 foot open well without diving equipment, cameras or claustrophobia.
There were only 4 gold coins in this cache, however one had a date and mint mark that made it extremely valuable.
FYI – one $20 gold piece is valued at about $1800.00 today, spot price (metal only) Read another Treasure Hunt.

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Buried Treasure

Wednesday, September 09th, 2009

Buried Treasure has been the root of visions of grandeur from the beginning of time. Most people would think of pirates and chests of gold but the reality is that buried treasure in various forms exists within a few minutes of us all the time. Within the short history of this nation, it was discovered that the safest place to store one’s valuables was in the ground within sight of one’s residence. Farmers buried their valuables with their work in mind, fields, barns, fence rows and outbuildings. Eighty five percent of the population of the United States were farmers prior to the Great Depression. City dwellers’ buried treasure was placed in the floor of the basement or hidden in the walls of the house.

Since conflict was first called war, soldiers going to war would bury their money so the enemy would not profit should they fall in battle. Even these small caches of buried treasure are worth thousands of dollars today as most of the money buried prior to World War I and earlier than the Romans has great numismatic value.

The Spanish hid great troves of coins and buried treasure in anticipation of Indian revolts here in early American history. The Jesuit priests continued to bury church artifacts to protect the church valuables from being stolen by the Indians that were upset at the Spaniards. Wagon trains would bury all money, gold, silver and treasures in a communal hole before the Indian would attack. Western robbers would bury stolen heavy coins for a faster get away. Many robbers were caught, killed or plagued with the changing landscape after 20 years in prison. Buried treasure comes in many forms over a vast period of time, but waits patiently just out of sight for the light of day.

There are thousands of reasons that mother earth was trusted with buried treasure; “don’t trust banks, don’t trust the government, don’t trust the kids, everyone is out to steal my valuables, etc., don’t trust the partner, don’t trust the spouse.” One of the greatest reasons for buried treasure is the pure convenience of it, no matter where you are at, there you are, with plenty of terra firma to hide buried treasure. When the government made it illegal to own gold, Gold Act of 1933 ($10,000 fine for violators) you must realize that this nation had used gold and silver coins as money since the conception of the nation. Paper money was a just a guarantee that you could turn the paper “note” into the bank for REAL cash coins. This one covert act caused millions of coins to be buried on farms, ranches, backyards, basements and fields or hidden in a secret niche with the great hope that someday the owners could retrieve their coins and once again have real cash on hand. Little did the hiders realize that it would take over forty years before the ability to own gold would be returned to the US citizens. Meanwhile owners died without revealing even to their children the secret buried treasure, some lost memory of where they buried it, some moved away with intentions of coming back but never returned, some went to war and were lost, some divorced and went their separate ways and the buried treasure is still there, lost forever by the original owners. During this forty years the children were taught that paper was money and gold and silver coins belonged in a museum. The value of gold and silver was made to seem meaningless as no one could have it so why look for buried treasure?

Within fifteen minutes or less of where you are sitting now, you will find buried treasure hidden away by someone that you may never know and their story never told… If you suspect that you have the location of a buried treasure, but need a confirmation before you dig, contact Underground Discovery for imaging and recovery.

Use the E-mail form below to contact us or call 480 463 7464.

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Treasure Stories

Friday, January 23rd, 2009

Treasure stories like this one started in the 1870’s when Sam Bass, an abominable Texas outlaw, robbed many stagecoaches near deadwood, in the Dakota territory. Bass and his partner, Joel Collins robbed the Union Pacific Railroad in Big Springs, Nebraska. In the treasure story, they confiscated a payroll of 3,000 consisting of newly-minted 1877 $20 gold coins. The 1,250 $20 gold coins were found, but the remainder of coins and jewelry was not found after they died. Rumor has it that Bass’s portion was 30 miles from Denton, Texas in Cove Hollow. Still a treasure story mystery today.

Another treasure story begins in 1894, when the First National Bank located in Bowie, Texas, was robbed by four men. 500 $20 gold pieces and $18,000 in cash was taken. Being founded in 1890, the bank issued $10 and $20 notes, any of those may have been taken during the robbery. The coins were buried before crossing the Red River, so as not to slow the journey with the weight of the coins. An end was put to the treasure story when the men were captured and hanged, but one confided in lawman Palmore as to where the gold was buried, which was under a cottonwood tree where the Red and Wichita Rivers meet.

If you believe you have the best information on a long lost treasure but would like to “see” if it really is underground before you dig, Call Underground Discovery, 480 463 7464 or email us below.
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Y2K Treasure

Saturday, March 19th, 2011

Y2K Treasure could have been cash, gold, silver, food, gas or water. The survivalist said Y2K treasure could be guns, ammunition or nuclear wardrobes. Aunt Pearl recounted that ALL the prognosticators on TBN said the social security checks would stop, Banks would lock their doors, water would become scarce and food would only be available for those who had bought Y2K canned and boxed rations!

We are very well aware that the Y2K scare sold a lot of generators and stuff that normally never sold well. Aunt Pearl bought it all, bottled water by the truck load, powdered food, canned goods, five gallon pails of rice and beans and gold… 30 thousand dollars of small bullion. Aunt Pearl was beginning to suffer from dementia and seldom remembered from one week to another where she had hid valuables. She had triple locks on every door, called the police each time she forgot, accusing neighbors and out of state relatives of breaking into her house while she was in town. Aunt Pearl lived alone with two dogs, three cats, a turtle and a parakeet. Aunt Pearl was fearless, she had a shotgun, two pistols and a snake charmer. Crank callers always got the same welcome from Aunt Pearl, cooing, she would beckon, “Come on over Sugar, and I’ll fill your ____ full of double aught buckshot!”

She called one day, and being her favorite nephew, (for the day), I conceded to come find her miniature gold bullion bars. She had a habit of stuffing 100 dollar bills in old dresses, coats or shoes so I knew the bullion could be anywhere on the five acres. Two hundred and fifty miles later, the grandma figure Aunt Pearl was hugging, laughing, loving to see me, it was her family welcome. A hundred questions later of is it under the bed, is it, is it, is it, I knew she was having a bad day and only the latest Long Range Gold Detector would bail her out.

As I unloaded the equipment, Aunt Pearl complained that she thought I was coming up to help her look for her gold, “You know I don’t have any faith in ‘lectronics!” At 89, Aunt Pearl was the self appointed “sagess” matriarch. She knew everything and she knew best. She always bragged, “The Lord only enriches those He can trust with riches!” I knew I had to produce or the wrath of Aunt Pearl would be revealed and directed in full power at me…
Within 10 minutes I had a signal that pointed directly under an ornamental plum tree that had obviously been planted in the last 14 months. “Aunt, did you dig the hole for this plum tree?”

“No Sugar, I had Eli from the church dig it and then I went to “Blooms O Plenty” and picked it up.”

“Do you remember placing the gold bars in the bottom of the hole before you planted the tree?”

“No son I don’t, do you think your cousin Jeff buried it there while I was in town?”

“Could have happened that way Aunt.” I chided, knowing she forgot that she had buried the gold.

We didn’t have to uproot the whole tree. By digging on the close side, I uncovered a canvas bag with all the bullion intact. Aunt Pearl placed the bullion in her safe beside her bed. She called from time to time to ask me again where I put her gold and quickly remembered as I reminded her that she had placed it beside her bed in the safe.

Three years later a vixen niece came to visit Aunt Pearl for a week. All of Aunt’s crystal, silver and valuables were loaded in the niece’s van to be taken to Virginia, I was surprised to find that the niece had coaxed the combination from Aunt Pearl and of course the safe was empty. Aunt Pearl was gone as well, deposited in a nursing home. Each time I saw her she asked again where had she put her gold. I merely replied, “Remember the safe beside your bed?”

“Yes. Oh, Thank you Sugar!”

Email or call 480 463 7464 for free consultation on your family treasure.
Another Treasure Story
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Treasure Hunting

Sunday, March 27th, 2011

Treasure Hunting Hazards!

Trespassers will be shot on sight. Then we prosecute!

“Not very friendly are they?” my brother, Dan, nodded at the sign hanging on the gate.

“Maybe they have reason not to be,” Paul answered as a blue pickup barreled down the dusty drive toward us. “When we spoke on the phone he said he was having serious problems with treasure hunters.” I chimed in.

Rex slammed on the breaks and stepped out of the cab with his hand extended over the top of the fence. He looked like Santa Claus with his white beard and pink cheeks, all smiles and welcoming us. “Come on up to the house and set a spell,” he said as he unlocked the gate and opened it.

A tall glass of sweet tea in hand, we settled in to listen to Rex’s story.

“I run a cow calf operation here. Have since my dad died and left the place to me years ago,” Rex said. “In all that time I’ve never had any trouble with trespassers. Never really cared if the occasional cowboy or neighbor took a short cut across the place. About a year ago, that changed. Suddenly, I was run over with treasure hunters carrying shovels and metal detectors looking for buried treasure. I don’t much care if they want to walk around in the heat and dig holes in this hard dirt. Mostly, they get tired quick and leave. But those mama cows care. A lot. Last week I had to rescue some fella clinging to a tree while one of those mamas stood under him shaking her horns. He was skinned from top to bottom and white as a sheet.” Rex chuckled.

“Then I got to thinkin’, what if someone got hurt out there. Never mind puttin’ up Keep Out signs, I’d be fighting a law suit ‘till I died.

“What do you suppose caused this interest? Did you plow up gold bars in the south forty?” I asked.

“Nothing that good,” Rex shook his head. “It was Uncle Willard.”

“Uncle Willard dug up gold bars?” Dan asked. We were both puzzled.

“No. This goes back to when Dad and Willard were kids. They had gone to town with grandpa. While he was in the bank doing some business, they got into his jug which was under the seat. They’d been talking about treasure hunting, pirates and robbers. After a few swigs, they got pretty bold and decided they’d go rob the drug store. Willard grabbed an old pistol they found hidden with the jug and stuck it in his pocket…just in case.”

“The boys slipped into the drug store and grabbed a grand total of $3.67 out of the cash box. Most of it was silver coins which Willard dumped into the pocket holding the pistol. Unfortunately, they weren’t the only boys who’d tried that trick over the years. Old Man Harper who owned the store kept a close eye on things. As soon as they started for the door he was hot on their heels. The local deputy just happened to be strolling down the street from the other direction and Dad and Willard were caught in the middle.”

“The deputy saw the pistol handle hanging out of Willard’s pocket and told him to take it out with two fingers and put it on the ground. Scared Willard so bad he turned the pocket full of change out. It went rolling down the plank sidewalk and most of it disappeared in the cracks. Willard was shaking so hard, he managed to pull the trigger and shot off half of dad’s big toe before he wet his pants.”

“Your dad wet his pants?” Paul asked.

“No, Willard wet his pants. Dad fainted.”

By this time we three brothers were laughing so hard tears were running down our faces.

“Granddad whipped both boys and made ‘em work for Old Man Harper all summer for free. They learned their lesson ‘cause neither one of ‘em ever got in trouble again. When we were kids, dad would take off his boots and socks, point at that half toe and say, ‘crime don’t pay, son.”

“Years later, Uncle Willard bought that drug store. Ran it ‘till he died,” Rex said.

“What did he do, bury his money out here?” Dan asked.

“Not exactly,” Rex said. “He made a small fortune with that drug store. Never married or had kids which made it easier. He put every cent in the bank, we think…”

“Willard missed his calling. He was a great story teller. For forty years he told every kid who sat down at his soda counter about the time he robbed his own store. With each telling that $3.67 grew. Last I heard, it was about $3 million. And he’d draw treasure maps. Waybills he called ‘em. He drew hundreds of those things. Unless he needed a hole dug somewhere in his yard, the maps were pretty vague. I have a dozen of ‘em in a desk drawer.”

“So treasure hunters are using Willard’s old maps to dig on your land? That right?” Paul asked.

“Not exactly. The digging started because of Maize Rainfeather,” Rex said. “That’s not her real name. She was born Mable Waters. She made up Maize Rainfeather. Thought it sounded Indian or mystical or something. She’s a little peculiar. Anyway, Maize writes a column in the weekly newspaper. She wrote a series about interesting people, living and dead from around here. Somewhere, she got a hold of one of Willard’s maps. Pointing to outlaw history, Maize eluded to Hell’s Canyon being a stashing place for every owlhoot’s cache that ever slept in the state. Then she conveniently merged stories and wrote how Willard buried over $3 million during the years he ran the drug store and printed that map in the same area which just happens to be in the middle on my property. If you hold the map upside down, Hell’s Canyon sort of looks like the little river and the bluffs in my pasture.”

“Did you ask the paper to print a retraction?” I asked.

“Tried. I said Willard never buried anything and there was no proof he did. They said there was no proof he didn’t either and refused to change Maize’s story,” Rex said with some disgust.

“I can see you have a problem with treasure hunters, but not how we can help. We find lost treasure,” I said. “What is it we can do for you?”

“Well, I want you to do what you do,” Rex said.

“I’m confused,” I said and shook my head.

“Blame Flo,” Rex said.

“Who’s Flo?”

“Flo’s my wife. Makes good tea, don’t she. Here you want some more?” Rex refilled our glasses and sat down.

“Flo read Maize’s article about Willard and says to me, ‘What if it’s true? What if Willard did bury a bunch of money up here? It would be just like him to do something mean like that!’ Willard cut off one of Flo’s pigtails when we were in school. She’s the kind of woman who knows how to hold a grudge.”

I said, “Flo, you know Willard never did any such thing. For one thing, Willard was allergic to a shovel! She rolled that around in her head for a few days and started again with what if.”

“Finally I asked her what she wanted me to do. “Find the treasure, don’t wait for a treasure hunter to find it!” she said. Never thought Flo would be bit by the gold bug. But bit she is. That’s why I called you fellas.” Rex looked as if that explained everything.

I looked at Dan and Paul. They looked back at me. “Let’s set up our equipment. We can tell you pretty quickly if there’s any lost treasure on the ranch.” I said.

“Mind if I help? Rex asked.

“Depends,” I answered. “Are you allergic to a shovel too?

“Nope, that was just Willard,” Rex laughed. “Come on, I’ll drive.”

Rex’s spread covered two and half sections. Between stopping to show us one sight or another and checking on a couple of cows, it took us the better part of the afternoon to check the entire ranch. We looked for gold, silver, and currency.

We finally ended up where we started, back on Rex’s front porch with more iced tea and a piece of the best chocolate pie I ever ate. If Mama hadn’t taught us better, we would have licked the plates.

“Rex, I don’t know if this is good news or not,” I said. “We didn’t find one trace of hidden treasure on your land. I’m sorry we have to disappoint Flo.”

“Oh, you won’t disappoint her,” Rex said.

“But I thought she wanted to find a pot of gold.”

“That would have been good, I reckon. Once I tell her she was right and I was wrong she’ll be just fine,” Rex said.

“But you weren’t wrong. There was nothing here.”

“Son, there’s two things you got to know. One, you don’t stay married to a woman for 43 years by telling her she’s wrong. And two, you don’t let a woman who can cook like she does go over a little thing like money,” Rex said.

“You’ve got a point there,” I said.

“Tell him the other news,’ Dan said.

“Well, we didn’t find anything on your land. But it looks like there’s something on the other side of the fence on your neighbor’s property.”

“I’ll be,” Rex laughed.

“You going to tell him about it?” Paul asked.

Rex shook his head. “Nope. If he wants to find treasure he can hire you fellas his ownself. Besides, I’ve been thinking about buying a few acres from him. Might want to charge me too much if he thought he had a lost gold mine or something.” Rex winked. “That still leaves me with my original problem. What am I gonna do about the treasure hunters?”

“If you can spare another piece of that pie, I think I may have an idea,” I said.

Later that evening we said our goodbyes to Rex. He was leaning over the gate with its new sign which read: Found it! Dug it!! Spent it!!!

If you are a treasure hunter or would like to find out if the treasure is still on your property, email us or call 480 463 7464.

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