Underground Discovery & Exploration

Underground Discovery & Exploration

Archive for May, 2011

Confederate Treasure

Saturday, May 21st, 2011

Confederate Treasure buried during the Civil War was just one side of the conflict. Similar treasures were buried in the North as the Southern Soldiers advanced on defenseless homes and farms.

“It’s somewhere in the orchard. She told me, “It’s right out there, next to one of those trees.”

This was a typical example of the beginning of a Confederate Treasure tale.

Standing on the veranda of the old home place I gazed out over the very mature, perfectly symmetrically planted peach orchard of 375 acres. The thought crossed my mind of how did this elderly lady’s great-grandfather mark the family Confederate treasure location, he supposedly buried years ago. Perhaps he didn’t, perhaps he just knew it as a particular tree or combination of trees. That information would have been long lost when he passed away, as he apparently was not able to tell anyone before he died of “the fever.”

I asked her if any of the trees had been cut down. She replied, “Well, yes the adjacent farm which is now my cousin’s place, was also part of the original home place, and half of it was orchard until 1940, when his trees were stumped and the land is now pasture.” This added another wrinkle in locating the gold and silver coin Confederate treasure cache she claimed had been buried during the civil war ravaged period of Sherman’s infamous march through Georgia.

In 1864 Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman of the Union Army began a campaign after leaving the captured city of Atlanta. The devastation his troops wreaked in Georgia ended with the capture of Savannah. The damage this march inflicted was widespread, from industry and infrastructure, to civilian property. This lady’s family owned farm had been directly in its path thus creating a fear of pillaging and a need to hide Confederate Treasure.

Sherman’s armies did not rely on traditional supply lines. Instead they “lived off the land,” after their 20 days of rations were consumed. Foraging units seized food and livestock from local farms for the Army while they destroyed the railroads and infrastructure of the state. The twisted and broken railroad rails that the troops heated over fires and wrapped around tree trunks and left behind became known as “Sherman’s neckties.” (One of these bent rails was actually leaning against the barn, partially imbedded in the ground, where someone in years past had skidded it to a halt.)

Neighbors and friends had warned one another of the impending destruction. Hastily, families assembled what treasure they had, such as gold or silver coin, and buried it in a clandestine location to keep the Confederate treasure from being taken by the marauders. Much was lost during those perilous days, but some was spirited away and buried.

She asked me if I thought we could find the cache her family had known of by stories handed down from generation to generation. She also told me with trembling lips she may have to put the place up for sale, as she could no longer keep it up. This was the last opportunity to look for the Confederate Treasure she felt was out there and rightfully hers.

“Let’s see,” I said, and powered up the long range detector.
An immediate hit was indicated, a direction that was directly out into the midst of the orchard. Perfectly in line with an old stone bridge that could easily be seen from the porch.

Wandering through the orchard of perfectly spaced trees I could not see anything that would indicate that a treasure was buried nearby. Finally the long range gold detector indicated I was at the spot. Uphill there was a rock ledge that protruded through the ground pointing directly at the tree trunk where I stood. The gold locator also indicated the gold was no longer there!

I suggested the owner’s treasure lay in the story of the history of this civil war Confederate treasure. She confided that she had the story already written but was waiting on the ending. Her creative mind immediately took a character from the annals of the family history, had him secretly dig the confederate treasure and move to Brazil to start a cattle ranch.

Every story doesn’t end in a recovery of treasure but we can tell if the treasure is still there to be found. Give us a call 480 463 7464

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[tag]Confederate Treasure,long range detector[/tag]

Gold Robbery Lies

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

Gold Robbery Lies are more prevalent than gold robbery truths. The frontier bank is held up, sometimes by design, others by chance, the banker has had his hand in the till, and now sees a way to come out squeaky clean. The banker claims $25,000.00 was stolen, when in actuality the robbers only took $1800.00. Even if the robber denies that he took that much, no one believes him and a new treasure story is born and more gold robbery lies are spun into the annals of history. The press has ALSO been guilty of perpetuating, exaggerating and downright fabricating amounts stolen in holdups under the guise of reporting (selling) the copy!

“$23,200 IN GOLD COIN BURIED BETWEEN THE OLSON PLACE AND THE BUTTERFIELD STAGE STOP! Only $1800 recovered. Robber hung and never reveals the location of the missing buried loot.” Truth or Gold Robbery Lies?

The forest road was crooked and rough. We bounced over the ruts and washes traversing the century and a half old ranch. One gold robbery happened on the old Star stage line that operated between Prescott and Santa Fe. The story that was published estimated the value of the un-circulated gold coins in 1879, to be $225,000.00. (Today’s value would make it well over $16 million.) The ranch owner chatted endlessly, divulging mountains of facts and treasure lore about this huge stash of gold coins. The bank decided that the gold coin shipment was to be a secret. A common freight wagon would transport the coins with no outriders for protection. Freight wagons were common on this route and everyday freight had never been robbed on this road. A stage station (a place to change horses, use the outhouse facilities, sometimes eat and always water) was located near a spring that was ¾ of a mile from the ranch headquarters. There were four robbers waiting for the shipment at the stage station when the freight wagon arrived. The robbers shot the guy “riding shotgun” and killed him, but the driver fell from the wagon seat, scrambled to the woods and escaped without being wounded. The driver returned in 50 minutes from the ranch house where the sheriff just happened to be lunching with a posse out on a different mission…

The law men raced into the stage station property where they discovered that the robbers were still there! The posse closed in and trapped the bandits in the station. A gun battle ensued and raged well into the dark without the first bandit giving up. The Sheriff started the stage station on fire, the bandits came running out shooting, and all 4 were killed at the station. The next morning the ashes were sifted, the grounds searched but the three boxes of gold coins were nowhere to be found. Claims were made that the 3 wooden boxes were never found. We do know that magic was not applied to make them disappear. What we have here is classic Gold Robbery Lies! There were just too many convenient happenings.

• No outriders, not even trailing the wagon.
• Sherriff only a stone’s throw from the robbery with a posse, having lunch.
• No one manning the stage station?
• Driver escapes without being shot.
• Why did the robbers stay at the stage station for almost an hour after the driver escaped?
• Why wasn’t the gold coins or melted gold found where the station had burned?
• The driver never saw the 3 boxes of gold. Tarp was already tied down when he arrived.

Underground Discovery started at the springs to set up the long range gold detector. (One of the theories was that the outlaws threw the coins in the springs.) The machine eliminated the springs immediately. The long range gold detector has the ability to find the current hidden gold coins or where they were buried and then dug up. The buried cache was located less than a half mile from where the station was located, right at the tree line of a lake. The caliche rock soil made for tough, slow digging when you are in a hurry. It was evident from 20 feet away that the ancient cache had been dug and the hole never recovered.

Now the facts to refute the Gold Robbery Lies:

• $225,000.00 of $20 gold one ounce coins equals a 74 foot long single roll of coins.
• $225,000.00 equals 11,250 coins.
• 11,250 coins weigh 771.43 pounds
• The coins are 1.33 inches in diameter . Each box would have to hold 24.66 feet of single roll coins.
• There were 3 wooden boxes to hold the gold coins each holding 257 pounds or 3750 coins.
• Each box would have to measure at least 8” by 6” by 12” long with and outside dimension of 9”X7”X13”.
• 24 rolls 12” long, 6 rolls to the layer, 4 layers of coins.
• The hole needed to be a minimum of 13” long by 9” wide by 21” deep to house the three boxes. Yes a smaller hole could be dug if you poured the coins in the hole loose without the boxes.

However, the empty hole was carefully scraped to the bottom. It was barely the width of a shovel and only 24” deep. An impossible size hole to house the 11,250 coins that needed to be extracted quickly at the time of retrieval. Second our equipment estimated that the size of the cache of gold coins had only been the size of a quart jar which would have fit the hole we were staring at perfectly. There is no way that there ever were 11,250 gold coins buried at this site. The machines don’t lie. We can tell how much, how deep, and sometimes how long it’s been there.

Let’s review the Gold Robbery Lies and the Gold Robbery facts:

• Obviously someone leaked out the information of the gold shipment,
• It appears that 6 men were involved in the robbery,
• The Ring leader (banker?), the freight wagon driver, and 4 fall guys.
• The quart size loot robbed by the 4 fall guys was payoff for the wagon driver.
• The rest of the loot was never put in the wagon…

Now one would have to do a little research to find out about insurance jobs back then, because with the information that Underground Discoveries was able to detect, the size of the shipment was defiantly not the size that was reported to the authorities. You see, not only can we discover where the loot is buried, we can tell how much is there as well. We found where the loot had been buried.

Our personal opinion is, whoever the inside guy was, knew where they were going to bury the gold, because the 3 to 4 hour job to dig the hard caliche rock hole had to have been dug prior to the robbery not in the 50 minute interval between the heist and the sheriff arrival. We suggest the small cache was for the wagon driver who had to have known in advance that the sheriff would be close by. The 4 fall guys had to have known the driver was part of the scheme, because 4 men can certainly shoot 2 un-expecting men on a stopped wagon. Or perhaps some treasure hunter happened across the small gold coin cache by accident. You make the call!

More Gold Robbery Lies survive the test of time because we as readers want there to be more there in the elusive treasure cache…

For a free consultation call 480 463 7464 or use the email form to contact us.

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[tag]Gold Robbery Lies,gold coins,buried treasure[/tag]

Long Range Detector for Gold Prospecting

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Long Range Detector for Gold Prospecting makes perfect sense. The Long Range Gold Detector saves time and a tremendous amount of money before mechanical exploration begins.

Southwest Idaho points to a history of mining (hydraulic) gold in record amounts. The claim sat on 700 hundred acres across the river from one of the richest deposits reclaimed with hydraulic pressure and thousands of Chinese workers. The overburden was nearly 300 feet and our client wanted us to find the hot spots in an ancient river that used to flow through the 700 acres, prior to a gigantic mud flow that moved the river to its present channel. The mission for the long range gold detector was as follows:

We knew that the long range detector for gold would locate a single one ounce gold coin at 450 feet away. We also knew that a gold concentration similar in size to a baby food jar had a specific registration that we could identify on the long range gold detector. What we did not know was if the long range detector for gold could find an accumulation of flour gold in pockets large enough to record at a depth of 300 feet.

The historic extraction of gold had been one of the largest in the nation’s history. The client needed to know if the gold was deposited in the “new bend” of the river or the gold was deposited continually. If the deposit was continually coming down stream before the channel change, then one could conclude that there was a gigantic amount of gold reserves in the old dry riverbed. The gold long range detector was truly being tested.

Survey stakes and tape in hand, we sat up on the cliff where the river used to run straight.

The long “U” shape of the river ran its course over ¾ of a mile. The long range detector for gold found several one-plus ounce targets and two baby food jar sized targets strewn over the 5/8 of a mile right of way that now was flagged and waving in the wind. There were no “mother loads”. The client was disappointed but relieved. There would be no millions spent on exploration and the mining company could terminate the lease and move on to more profitable areas.

It seems that the large slow moving new “U” in the river had trapped the flour gold in huge pockets. The original straight river course shot the flour gold downstream to be trapped elsewhere. There could have been other minuscule gold in the old river bed that the long range gold detector did not register, however the cost to remove the 300 foot overburden would have far outweighed any amount of unknown flour gold.

The long range detector for gold continues to be the premier tool for exploration of gold ore and confirmation of buried gold bullion and coins. Read more long range locators.

Call for free consultation, 480 463 7464 or email using form below.

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